Best Mirrorless Camera for Beginners | Guide & Reviews

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So, you’re new to photography and you’ve decided that a mirrorless camera might be right for you. But choosing the perfect one can be a daunting process. One look at the range of options will make any beginner photographer quiver in their boots. 

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That’s why I’ve created this beginner’s guide. Here, I break down the top mirrorless cameras for beginners, as well as a buyer’s guide so you know which features to look out for. The goal is to help you find the camera that’s best suited to your tastes and preferences. If you like this guide you’ll also like my best travel cameras guide.

So let’s get into it!

What is a Mirrorless Camera?

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For many decades, DSLRs were the professional standard in the world of photography. Other camera types were available, but none challenged the DSLR in terms of quality and functionality.

That all changed with the introduction of mirrorless cameras. They’re almost identical to DSLRs in terms of quality and control, but they’re also much lighter, smaller and easier to carry around. So how’s that possible?

In a nutshell, mirrorless cameras do away with the bulky mirror mechanism that DSLRs rely on. This mirror mechanism is used to direct light to the optical viewfinder. When a picture is taken, it flips the mirror out of the way to expose the sensor. 

Mirrorless cameras, on the other hand, don’t use optical viewfinders. This allows them to direct the light straight toward the sensor, removing the need for a mirror mechanism. 

Why Go Mirrorless?

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So, mirrorless cameras are innovative. But why should you buy one?

There’s a number of reasons why mirrorless cameras are a great option. But the most noteworthy is that they offer the portability and convenience of a classic point-and-shoot camera, with the quality and functionality of a DSLR. This is a wonderful combination of traits, especially if you love travelling and getting out and about with your camera, like me.

Going mirrorless means that packing and carrying your camera is much less of a chore than with a DSLR. And you don’t have to compromise quality or control!

Beginner’s Guide to the Best Mirrorless Cameras – At a Glance

Fujifilm X-A5 - ALL-ROUND BEST26.1MP APS-C sensorExcellent image qualityCrisp 4K videoFlip-out screenIBIS

 

ALL-ROUND BEST

26.1MP APS-C sensor

Excellent image quality

Crisp 4K video

Flip-out screen

IBIS

Sony a6400 - All-round use, vloggers24.2MP APS-C sensorExcellent images and videoFlip-out screen4K video

 

All-round use, vloggers

24.2MP APS-C sensor

Excellent images and video

Flip-out screen

4K video

Sony A7 Mark III - All-round use, video24.2MP full-frame sensorAmazing image qualityStunning 4K videoIBIS

 

All-round use, video

24.2MP full-frame sensor

Amazing image quality

Stunning 4K video

IBIS

Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark III - Travel, value for money20.4MP Micro Four Thirds sensorRelatively affordableGreat 4K videoCompact and lightweightIBIS

 

Travel, value for money

20.4MP Micro Four Thirds sensor

Relatively affordable

Great 4K video

Compact and lightweight

IBIS

Fujifilm X-T30 - Travel, value for money26.1MP APS-C sensorRelatively affordableExcellent images and 4K videoLight and compact

 

Travel, value for money

26.1MP APS-C sensor

Relatively affordable

Excellent images and 4K video

Light and compact

Panasonic Lumix DC-GH5 - Video20.3MP Micro Four Thirds sensorFantastic 4K videoIBISRugged

 

Video

20.3MP Micro Four Thirds sensor

Fantastic 4K video

IBIS

Rugged

Canon EOS R - Canon fans30MP full-frame sensorGreat viewfinderHigh-quality images

 

Canon fans

30MP full-frame sensor

Great viewfinder

High-quality images

Sony a7R III - All-round use, wildlife, action42.4MP full-frame sensorExcellent image quality and 4K video

 

All-round use, wildlife, action

42.4MP full-frame sensor

Excellent image quality and 4K video

Panasonic Lumix G9 - Outdoor, wildlife, action20.3MP Micro Four Thirds sensorRelatively affordableGreat images and 4K videoRuggedIBIS

 

Outdoor, wildlife, action

20.3MP Micro Four Thirds sensor

Relatively affordable

Great images and 4K video

Rugged

IBIS

Fujifilm X-H1 - Video24MP APS-C sensorRelatively affordableExcellent 4K video performanceHigh-quality imagesIBIS

 

Video

24MP APS-C sensor

Relatively affordable

Excellent 4K video performance

High-quality images

IBIS

Sony A7R IV - High-end, all-round use, high resolution61.2MP full-frame sensorTop of the range cameraExceptional photos and 4K videoIBIS

 

High-end, all-round use, high resolution

61.2MP full-frame sensor

Top of the range camera

Exceptional photos and 4K video

IBIS

Sony a6600 - All-round use, vloggers24MP APS-C sensorExcellent battery lifeGreat images and 4K videoFlip-out screenIBIS

 

All-round use, vloggers

24MP APS-C sensor

Excellent battery life

Great images and 4K video

Flip-out screen

IBIS

Canon EOS M5 - Value for money, travel24MP APS-C sensorAffordableCompact

 

Value for money, travel

24MP APS-C sensor

Affordable

Compact

Sony Alpha a6000 - All-round use, value for money, travel24.3MP APS-C sensorVery affordableCompact

 

All-round use, value for money, travel

24.3MP APS-C sensor

Very affordable

Compact

Fujifilm X-A5 - All-round use, value for money, travel24.2MP APS-C sensorVery affordableGreat image qualityEasy to useFlip-out screen

 

All-round use, value for money, travel

24.2MP APS-C sensor

Very affordable

Great image quality

Easy to use

Flip-out screen

Canon EOS M50 - Value for money, ease of use24.1MP APS-C sensorAffordableEasy to useGreat electronic viewfinderFlip-out screen

 

Value for money, ease of use

24.1MP APS-C sensor

Affordable

Easy to use

Great electronic viewfinder

Flip-out screen


How to Choose a Mirrorless Camera

I know what choosing a new camera is like – every option is paired with a myriad of unfamiliar features, specs, and buzzwords that can make your head spin.

Don’t worry, I’m here to clear up some of the haziness around picking the perfect camera. It’s all a lot simpler than it seems.

Features to Look for in a Mirrorless Camera

All cameras have a different set of features. And your choice will depend on the combination of features that best suits your preferences. Here’s a breakdown of the most common features, so you can start to get an idea of what to look out for.

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Size

It may not be the first consideration that comes to mind, but the size and weight of your new camera is an important thing to think about. Ideally, you’ll want a camera that is small and light, so that it’s comfortably and portable. This is particularly true if you’re going to be using it on the go or for travel photography. 

That said, some people prefer their camera to have a bit of weight to it. So, ultimately, this comes down to personal preference.

Megapixels

During your camera research, you’ll likely come across the term ‘megapixels’ – a word which you may remember from the camera phone craze of the 2000s.

A camera’s resolution is measured in megapixels (MP). And generally speaking, the higher the resolution, the better the image. Higher-resolution images can also be blown up to larger sizes. 

But the truth is that only professional photographers need to worry about finding very high megapixel cameras. As a casual photographer, you’ll likely be fine with any camera offering around 20 megapixels or higher.

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Sensor Size

The sensor is the component in a digital camera that captures light. They come in a variety of sizes, ranging from full-frame (which is the largest) down to Micro Four Thirds. APS-C is the size in between, and is most common in mirrorless cameras

Generally speaking, the larger the sensor, the better the image quality and low-light performance. If you’re taking photos at night, you’ll definitely want a larger sensor.

4K Video

‘4K video’ has been a bit of a buzz word in recent years. It’s a measure of video resolution that is considered crisper and higher quality than 1080p video.

It’s true, 4K video does look good. So if you’re planning on doing a lot of filming, and want room to grow, it might be something to consider. But it isn’t a strictly necessary feature for casual photographers.

WiFi/Bluetooth

I consider built-in WiFi an essential feature, because of the way I like to work. It offers a range of functionalities that I find useful. For example, it allows you to wirelessly transfer images from your camera to your smartphone or laptop for editing and uploading. 

This is particularly handy when you’re not carrying your laptop with you. A simple transfer to your smartphone allows you to keep your pictures safe and your social media up to date.

Most WiFi cameras also allow you to control them remotely using your smartphone. So you can set up selfies or group shots with ease. As well as get some awesome wildlife photos without scaring away the animals.

Bluetooth offers similar functionality to WiFi, and NFC (near field communication) can help make connecting your devices easier.

Camera Lens

FUJINON 35MM LENS IMAGE QUALITY.jpg FUJI 35MM F1.4 REVIEW.jpg

Having a good lens can make all the difference to your photography – but they can also be super expensive. As a beginner photographer, you’re best off buying a camera body with an included kit lens. These kit lenses generally aren’t top-quality, but they’re usually affordable, versatile, and allow you to find your feet.

Once you’ve gotten comfortable using your camera, you’ll be better equipped to buy a lens that’s suited to your preferred tastes and styles.

Check out my guide to the best Fujifilm lenses for some more detailed information.

Weather-sealing

It’s easy to confuse ‘weather-sealed’ with ‘waterproof’. But in reality, these terms don’t mean the same thing. Weather-sealed cameras are made to withstand damp conditions, condensation, and dust. But I certainly wouldn’t suggest taking them for a swim.

Nonetheless, weather-sealing does come in handy when you want to shoot on drizzly or misty days. It protects the internal working of your camera in these conditions, offering some peace of mind. And it definitely beats using a plastic bag.

You can buy the presets used on these images in my shop

Looks/Aesthetic

Ok, so most people might not consider the looks of a camera to be important. But I do! (I’m vain what can I say), I want my camera to catch my eye and get me excited about heading out to shoot with it. A good-looking camera inspires me to use it, and I think this is true for others, too.

Pick something that looks and feels good around your neck and in your hands. Something that makes you smile when you see it.

In-body Image Stabilisation

In-body image stabilisation (or IBIS) is a built-in system that stabilises your shots and videos. 

It’s pretty much essential to have some kind of stabilisation, whether it’s in the camera body or the lens. But having it in the body offers you the freedom to choose lenses without stabilisation and to get even smoother results with stabilised lenses. So it’s definitely a worthwhile consideration.

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Slow-mo Features

Slow-motion is another non-essential feature. But it does offer you some flexibility and the ability to shoot some cool-looking videos. Cameras with slow-motion capabilities can shoot at a higher frame rates, so that the video can be slowed down without compromising smoothness. It’s a nice effect, but not entirely necessary.

Pros and Cons of Choosing a Mirrorless Camera

There are plenty of good reasons to get a mirrorless camera when you’re starting out. But they may not be for everyone. Here are the main advantages and disadvantages.

Pros of Mirrorless Cameras

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  • They’re generally smaller and lighter than DSLRs

  • They usually match DSLRs in terms of image quality and control

  • Many of them come with an electronic viewfinder, allowing you to see how the image will turn out before you take it

  • They are often faster than DSLRs

  • The autofocus systems tend to be better

Cons of Mirrorless Cameras

  • They tend to have shorter battery lives than DSLRs

  • They can take a little long to turn on and be ready to shoot

  • There is a smaller selection of lenses available for mirrorless cameras – although this is improving with time

Mirrorless Camera Reviews for Beginners

Now, without further adieu, here’s my breakdown of the 16 best mirrorless cameras for beginners.

Fujifilm X-T4 – The All Round Best Camera For Beginners

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  • Sensor: APS-C

  • Resolution: 26.1MP

  • 4K Video: Yes

  • Connectivity: WiFi and Bluetooth

  • Weather-sealing: Yes

  • IBIS: Yes 

I’m going to kick off this list with a personal favourite of mine: the Fujifilm X-T4

I recently replaced my older Fujifilm X-T2 with the X-T4, and I’ve been in love with it ever since. It’s visually stunning, wonderful to use, and packed full of awesome features. Making it one of the best Fujifilm cameras available.

In my opinion, the X-T4 is the best hybrid camera on the market. By that, I mean, it’s amazing at both still images and 4K video. So if you’re interested in both formats, I would highly recommend this camera.

One of the main features that caught my attention was the fully articulated flip-out screen, which is perfect for vlogging and selfies.

Check out my unboxing video of the Fujifilm X-T4 here to see more!

Pros:

  • Excellent images and 4K video

  • Great design

  • Amazing performance across the board

Cons: 

  • A little pricey for beginners

Sony a6400

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  • Sensor: APS-C CMOS

  • Resolution: 24.2MP

  • 4K Video: Yes

  • Connectivity: WiFi and Bluetooth

  • Weather-sealing: Yes

  • IBIS: No

The Sony a6400 bridges the gap between the older a6300 and the more expensive a6500. It’s effectively the same camera as it’s predecessor, but with some shiny new features bolted on.

The image quality is brilliant, the tracking autofocus system is top-notch, and the price tag is very reasonable. It features a flip-out screen for selfies, and it shoots high-quality 4K video. But beware – this model doesn’t have in-body image stabilisation, so the video can be a bit shaky, particularly if you don’t have a stabilised lens.

The biggest downside is the camera’s lack of external controls. This means having to dive into Sony’s notoriously disorganised menu system to change settings. A little inconvenient for photography on the fly. 

But with that said, the a6400 is still a great mirrorless camera for the money. I own the Sony a6400 and was mainly using it for vlogging and video, before I upgrade to the X-T4 and will say that the video quality is top-notch and with a remote that I brought on amazon for £5. I was able to control the camera to create my Youtube videos. 

Pros:

  • Excellent images and video

  • Flip-out screen

Cons:

  • Lack of external controls

  • No IBIS

Sony A7 Mark III

Sony A7 Mark III.png
  • Sensor: Full-frame

  • Resolution: 24.2MP

  • 4K Video: Yes

  • Connectivity: WiFi, Bluetooth, and NFC

  • Weather-sealing: Yes

  • IBIS: Yes

Sony’s A7 Mark III gives my X-T4 a serious run for its money – and that’s saying a lot, coming from me. 

The A7 boasts a top-quality, full-frame sensor, which is exceedingly rare at this price point. As a result, the image quality is exceptional and the camera performs brilliantly in low-light conditions.

It also shoots lush 4K video and features in-body image stabilisation, so it’s a dream for film-makers. Plus, the camera is weather-sealed to protect against moisture and dust.

If you’re looking for an excellent all-rounder and you’re willing to part with a bit of cash, Sony’s A7 is an amazing option.

Pros:

  • Amazing image quality

  • Stunning 4K video 

  • Full-frame sensor

Cons:

  • Sony’s fiddly menu system

  • A bit expensive for some beginners

Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark III – The Best Mirrorless Camera for Travel

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  • Sensor: Micro Four Thirds

  • Resolution: 20.4MP

  • Weight: 414g

  • 4K Video: Yes

  • Connectivity: WiFi and Bluetooth

  • Weather-sealing: Yes

  • IBIS: Yes

The OM-D E-M5 Mark III may not be the best or cheapest camera on the market. But it offers brilliant performance for the price. It’s compact, well-built, and capable of shooting some awesome pictures and videos. Making it a great option for beginners who like to travel and get outside.

In terms of price and specs, it’s a rival to the Sony a6400. It uses a Micro Four Thirds sensor, which is smaller than most cameras in its price range. But the stunning image quality goes to show that a Micro Four Thirds sensor can hold its own in a well-designed camera.

Pros:

  • Compact and lightweight

  • Great performance for the price

  • Impressive image stabilisation

Cons:

  • May feel too lightweight for some people

  • Battery life could be better

Fujifilm X-T30 – The Best Mirrorless Camera Under £1000

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  • Sensor: APS-C

  • Resolution: 26.1MP

  • 4K Video: Yes

  • Connectivity: WiFi and Bluetooth

  • Weather-sealing: No

  • IBIS: No

Fujifilm’s X-T30 has been nicknamed the ‘Little Giant’ because it’s small in size but big on performance. It’s effectively the little sibling of the high-end X-T3 – the predecessor to my beloved X-T4. And it offers some serious bang for your buck.

The X-T30 shares many of the features found in its high-end sibling, but comes in at around half the price. So it’s a brilliant option for anyone who’s fond of Fujifilm, but has a tighter budget to consider. It’s small too, so it’s a perfect addition to your travel gear.

The 26.1MP APS-C sensor is really impressive. It’s the same as the one found in the X-T3, allowing this little beast to capture excellent-quality images and crisp 4K video. The autofocus system is fantastic and the burst speed is first-rate, all in a compact body.

It falls short slightly in the way that the screen can’t flip 180 degrees, and there is no built-in stabilisation. But hey, you can’t have it all, right?

Pros:

  • Excellent all-round performance

  • Relatively affordable

  • Compact and light

Cons:

  • No in-body image stabilisation

  • Screen can’t be flipped around

  • Not weather-sealed

Panasonic Lumix DC-GH5 – The Best Mirrorless Camera for Video

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  • Sensor: Micro Four Thirds

  • Resolution: 20.3MP

  • 4K Video: Yes

  • Connectivity: WiFi and Bluetooth

  • Weather-sealing: Yes

  • IBIS: Yes

Panasonic cameras have long been leaders when it comes to high-quality video. And the Lumix DC-GH5 continues this legacy. It’s an awesome all-rounder and one of the best cameras for 4K video on the market.

It houses a great Micro Four Thirds sensor that’s impressive for its size, and the camera boasts a rugged design. It features in-body stabilisation, fast burst speeds, and a large, high-res viewfinder. The controls are also excellent.

This is a great option if you want a brilliant video camera that can hold its own in stills photography, at a reasonable price.

Pros:

  • Fantastic 4K video performance

  • Rugged design

Cons:

  • Small sensor

  • Bigger than most Micro Four Thirds cameras

Canon EOS R

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  • Sensor: Full-frame

  • Resolution: 30MP

  • 4K Video: Yes (cropped)

  • Connectivity: WiFi, Bluetooth, and NFC

  • Weather-sealing: Yes

  • IBIS: No

The Canon EOS R is a full-frame mirrorless camera that captures some pretty fantastic pictures. It features an impressive autofocus system, a high-quality viewfinder, and a smooth touchscreen interface.

The full-frame sensor shoots at 30 megapixels, offering great low light performance and dynamic range. 

While it’s an impressive camera all round, some users think that it falls a little short of its competition. In my opinion, the Sony A7 III or Fujifilm X-T4 are stronger options for the money. But if you’re set on getting a Canon, then this is still a great piece of kit.

Pros:

  • Great viewfinder

  • High resolution

  • High-quality images

Cons:

  • Some competing cameras offer similar features for less money

Sony a7R III

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  • Sensor: Full-frame

  • Resolution: 42.4MP

  • 4K Video: Yes

  • Connectivity: WiFi, Bluetooth, and NFC

  • Weather-sealing: Yes

  • IBIS: Yes

Sony’s a7R III is arguably the most accessible full-frame camera available at the moment. The sensor captures images at a staggering 42.4MP resolution, and the image quality is superb.

If you’re keen on getting into action-based photography, you’ll love the 10fps burst speed with tracking. And wildlife enthusiasts will appreciate the silent shutter option. 

The battery life is impressive, and the camera is great for video. It shoots in crisp 4K with an autofocus system that handles video almost flawlessly.

The screen tilts to 45° for shooting at awkward angles. But selfie-lovers and vloggers beware – it doesn’t flip all the way around.

This is a fantastic camera on the whole, and one that any beginner can comfortably grow into. But the price tag may be a little steep for some novices.

Pros:

  • Very high resolution

  • Full-frame sensor

  • Stunning photos and videos

Cons:

  • Menu system could be better

  • No built-in flash

  • Quite pricey

Panasonic Lumix G9

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  • Sensor: Micro Four Thirds

  • Resolution: 20.3MP

  • 4K Video: Yes

  • Connectivity: WiFi and Bluetooth

  • Weather-sealing: Yes

  • IBIS: Yes

The Lumix G9 is often considered the cream of the crop when it comes to outdoor, wildlife, and action photography. It’s built like a tank, is weather-sealed, and produces stunning images, despite its small sensor. The burst speed is impressive, at 20fps with autofocus, and 60fps without it.

In true Panasonic style, the G9 is also great at capturing video in 4K. The image-stabilisation keeps things smooth and blur-free, while the autofocus is snappy and effective. In addition, the high-resolution mode allows you to take 80MP pictures of static scenes.

At a relatively affordable price, this camera is a great option for any budding wildlife or sports photographer.

Pros:

  • Fast burst speeds

  • Good-looking images and video

  • Great autofocus system

Cons:

  • Small sensor for the price

  • Not the best battery life

Fujifilm X-H1

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  • Resolution: 24MP

  • Sensor: APS-C

  • 4K Video: Yes

  • Connectivity: WiFi and Bluetooth

  • Weather-sealing: Yes

  • IBIS: Yes

With a range of serious video features, 4K capabilities, and 5-axis image stabilisation, the Fuji X-H1 is potentially Fujifilm’s best video camera to date. And it shoots some incredibly high-quality images to match.

It’s built to last and is weather-sealed, with dual memory card slots for extra storage. The LCD screen tilts but doesn’t swivel – so keep that in mind if you’re a vlogger or selfie enthusiast.

On the whole, this is a great option for Fuji fans who are keen on doing some videography as well and photography. The X-T4 may be better all-round, but the X-H1 comes with a lighter price tag.

Pros:

  • Great 4K video performance

  • Specialist videographer tools and features

  • High-quality images

Cons:

  • Recording video uses the battery up quickly

  • No built-in flash

  • Some competing brands offer tempting alternatives

Sony A7R IV – The Best Sony Mirrorless Camera

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  • Sensor: Full-frame

  • Resolution: 61.2MP

  • 4K Video: Yes

  • Connectivity: WiFi, Bluetooth, and NFC

  • Weather-sealing: Yes

  • IBIS: Yes

There’s no question that Sony’s A7R IV is an expensive camera. But it’s also the most professional bit of kit on this list, with performance that’s suited to even the most advanced photographers. So you’ll have plenty of room to grow. 

It’s the updated version of the A7R III, which I discussed earlier, with some improvements in terms of handling, resolution, and all-round performance. Making it a contender for the best mirrorless camera on the market.

Its full-frame sensor boasts a mind-boggling 61.2MP resolution. So if image size is your priority, the A7R IV is the strongest on this list by a mile. The images it captures are breathtaking and it shoots excellent 4K video to boot.

Another noteworthy feature is the camera’s ability to composite images in order to create a 240MP image of static subjects.

While the price may make it inaccessible for some, this is the camera to go for if you want nothing but the very best.

Pros:

  • Full-frame

  • Extremely high resolution

  • Incredible all-round performance

Cons:

  • Very expensive for a first camera

Sony a6600

Sony a6600.png
  • Sensor: APS-C

  • Resolution: 24MP

  • 4K Video: Yes

  • Connectivity: WiFi, Bluetooth, and NFC

  • Weather-sealing: Yes

  • IBIS: Yes

The Sony a6600 is the top-of-the-line model in the a6000 series. In terms of image quality, it isn’t that different from other models in the series. But it sets itself apart in terms of superior build quality, battery life, and in-body stabilisation.

It features a top-quality APS-C sensor and a brilliant, real-time tracking focus system. It’s great for shooting 4K video, and the flip-out screen helps make it a top choice for vloggers. 

All-in-all, the a6600 is an awesome middle-budget option for general use.

Pros:

  • Excellent autofocus system, great for human subjects

  • Amazing battery life

Cons:

  • Ergonomics could be improved

  • Cramped controls

Canon EOS M5

Canon EOS M5.png
  • Sensor: APS-C

  • Resolution: 24MP

  • 4K Video: No

  • Connectivity: WiFi and Bluetooth

  • Weather-sealing: No

  • IBIS: Yes

The Canon EOS M5 is a compact powerhouse, offering great image and video capabilities in a small body. Along with a good level of external control. It’s not often you find an APS-C sized sensor in such a small camera.

The image stabilisation and autofocus systems are both fantastic. And the build quality is great, too. Unfortunately, it doesn’t shoot 4K video and the 1080p footage that it does shoot lacks some detail. So it’s not an ideal option for video-lovers.

Overall, it offers great performance for an affordable price, and is an excellent camera for enthusiasts.

Pros:

  • Great external controls

  • Good autofocus and stabilisation

Cons:

  • No 4K capabilities

  • Quality suffers in low light

  • No weather sealing

Sony Alpha a6000

Sony Alpha a6000.png
  • Sensor: APS-C

  • Resolution: 24.3MP

  • 4K Video: No

  • Connectivity: WiFi and NFC

  • Weather-sealing: No

  • IBIS: No

Sony’s a6000 was first released in 2014, but it still offers excellent performance at a very reasonable price. It’s a lot cheaper than all of the other Sony options on this list.

The 24-megapixel APS-C sensor captures stunning images and decent 1080p video. The autofocus is great, and the camera has a built-in electronic viewfinder. 

It doesn’t shoot in 4K, and it feels a little dated at times. But the features it offers are incredible for the price, and are still great by today’s standards.

Pros:

  • Affordable

  • Compact

  • Great image quality

Cons:

  • No 4K video

  • Feels slightly dated

  • No weather sealing

  • No image stabilisation

Fujifilm X-A5 – The Best Beginner Mirrorless Camera

Fujifilm X-A5.png
  • Sensor: APS-C

  • Resolution: 24.2MP

  • 4K Video: Yes – but only at 15fps

  • Connectivity: WiFi and Bluetooth

  • Weather-sealing: No

  • IBIS: Lens-only

When it comes to entry-level mirrorless cameras, it’s hard to beat Fujifilm’s highly-affordable X-A5. Sure, the specs aren’t anything to write home about, but the X-A5 allows budding photographers to capture stunning images with ease. 

If you’ve been enjoying smartphone photography, the X-A5 is an ideal step-up into the world of cameras. Unfortunately, there’s no viewfinder. But the flip-out screen is perfect for selfies and vlogging.

Pros:

  • Very affordable

  • Great image quality

  • Easy to use

Cons:

  • No viewfinder

  • No weather-sealing

  • Only 15fps 4K

Canon EOS M50  – The Best Budget Mirrorless Camera

Canon EOS M50.png
  • Sensor: APS-C

  • Resolution: 24.1MP

  • 4K Video: Yes

  • Connectivity: WiFi, Bluetooth, and NFC

  • Weather-sealing: No

  • IBIS: No

Canon’s EOS M50 is an affordable, entry-level mirrorless camera, offering fantastic image quality for the price. It’s also easy to use, which is helpful when learning the photography ropes.

The touch screen is fully-articulated for selfies, and the camera includes a brilliant electronic viewfinder – a feature that’s not often found on cameras in this price range. The camera doesn’t offer an extensive range of features, but it makes a great first camera for beginners.

Pros:

  • Relatively affordable

  • Easy to use

  • Great electronic viewfinder

  • Excellent image quality

Cons:

  • Plastic exterior

  • Battery life isn’t great

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Finding the Best Beginner Mirrorless Camera

Your first camera will hold a special place in your heart. It’ll be the camera that introduces you to the wonderful world of photography, and allows you to flourish. The process of finding it may not be easy, but it’s an incredibly rewarding pursuit.

Whether you’re an up-and-coming vlogger, an enthusiastic photographer, or a budding videographer, there’s a mirrorless camera on this list for you. I hope that my guide has been helpful in your search, and that your new camera serves you well.

If you love to travel, check out my guide to the best travel cameras.


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